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I’m here in Germany and watching the events in Israel unfold with immense interest, given Germany’s anti-Semitic past.

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And there are still anti-Semites. Instead of, say, celebrating Oktoberfest this past month or the month earlier, for them, October is their occasion to conduct anti-Semitic protests, targeting Israel. They have come out into the streets.

Here is a rough lay of the land, describing the uneven response from the authorities:

While two anti-Israel demonstrations were banned in Berlin, Israel haters marched in Frankfurt and Cologne this past October.